Lighting Comparison: LED vs Fluorescent and CFL (2022)

12 Minute Read

Do you wonder what’s better: fluorescent lights (including compact fluorescent lights, or CFLs) or light emitting diodes (LEDs)? Well here’s a head-to-head comparison of the two followed by an in-depth discussion of each technology in turn.

Fluorescent (or CFL)

What is a Fluorescent Light or a CFL?

Fluorescent light bulbs are a specific type of gas-discharge light (also known as a high intensity discharge, HID, or arc light). CFL is an acronym that stands for compact fluorescent light. Standard fluorescent lights are available in tubes (generally 48 to 84 inches in length). CFLs are much smaller. They are still tubes but they are, as the name implies, “compact.” CFLs were designed to replace standard applications for incandescent bulbs as they are both more efficient and longer lasting.

Fluorescent bulbs produce light by converting ultraviolet emissions with a fluorescent coating on the inside of the tube. UV radiation is generated in the first place by an electrical charge that is run through the inert mercury glass internal to the bulb. The gas is excited by the electricity and releases ultraviolet radiation as a consequence. Fluorescent lights require ignition, which is typically provided by a voltage pulse or a third electrode (an additional metal part) internal to the bulb. Starting is relatively simple with small tubes but can require significant voltage with larger lights.

Fluorescent light bulbs previously required a “warm-up” period in order to evaporate the internal gas into plasma, but now there are several near-instantaneous starting technologies for fluorescent light (those include “quick-start,” “instant start,” and “rapid-start”). Additionally, as the light heats up it requires additional voltage to operate. Voltage requirements in fluorescent bulbs are balanced by a ballast (a magnetic device in older bulbs and an electrical one in newer fluorescent technology). As the fluorescent light ages, more and more voltage is required to produce the same amount of light until eventually the voltage exceeds the fixed resistance provided by the ballast and the light goes out (fails). Fluorescent lights become less and less efficient over time because they must use more and more voltage to produce the same lumen output as the light degrades.

What’s the Upside to Fluorescent Lights?

Fluorescent technology has been around for more than 100 years and it generally represents a high efficiency way to provide lighting over a vast area. The lights are much more efficient as well as longer lasting than incandescent bulbs, however, they fail in both categories when compared to LED.

What are the Major Deficiencies in Fluorescent Lights?

Among the deficiencies in fluorescent lighting are the following:

  1. Fluorescent lights contain toxic mercury.Mercury, as well as the phosphor inside the bulbs, are hazardous materials that present a waste disposal issue at the end of a light’s life. Broken bulbs release a small amount of toxic mercury as a gas and the rest is contained in the glass itself.
  2. Fluorescent lights age significantly if they are frequently switched on and off.Typical lamp life for a CFL is about 10,000 hours but this can degrade as a consequence of frequent switching (turning on and off). Burning life is extended if lamps remain on continuously for long periods of time. It’s worth thinking about in the event that you are using CFLs in conjunction with motion sensors that frequently activate and time out.
  3. Fluorescent lights are omnidirectional.Omnidirectional lights produce light in 360 degrees. This is a large system inefficiency because at least half of the light needs to be reflected and redirected to the desired area being illuminated. It also means that more accessory parts are required in the light fixture itself in order to reflect or focus the luminous output of the bulb (thus increasing unit costs).

Lighting Comparison: LED vs Fluorescent and CFL (1)What are the Minor Deficiencies in Fluorescent Lights?

Among the minor deficiencies in fluorescent lighting are the following:

  1. Older fluorescent lights have a brief warm-up period. Once the arc is ignited it melts and evaporates metal salts internal to the device. The light doesn’t arrive at full power until the salts are fully evaporatedinto plasma. This is corrected in many newer models that utilize “rapid start” or similar technologies.
  2. Fluorescent lighting emits a small amount of UV radiation.Ultraviolet light is known to cause fading of dyed items or paintings exposed to their light.
  3. Fluorescent lightsrequire a ballast to stabilize the light.In the event that there is a minor flaw in the ballastthe light may produce an audible hum or buzz.

Where are Fluorescent Lights Commonly Used?

Common applications for fluorescent lighting include warehouses and schools or commercial buildings. CFLs are also used as a replacement for incandescent lights in many residential applications.

LED Lighting:

What is a Light Emitting Diode (LED)?

LED stands for light emitting diode

. A diode is an electrical device or component with two electrodes (an anode and a cathode) through which electricity flows - characteristically in only one direction (in through the anode and out through the cathode). Diodes are generally made from semi-conductive materials such as silicon or selenium - solid state substances that conduct electricity in some circumstances and not in others (e.g. at certain voltages, current levels, or light intensities).

When current passes through the semiconductor material the device emits visible light.It is very much the opposite of a photovoltaic cell(a device that converts visible light into electrical current).

If you’re interested in the technical details of how an LED works you can read more about ithere.

  • Benefits of led lighting vs fluorescent tubes

What’s the Major Upside to LED Lights?

There are four major advantages to LED lighting:

  1. LEDs have an extremely long lifespan relative to every other lighting technology (including fluorescent lights). New LEDs can last 50,000 to 100,000 hours or more. The typical lifespan for a fluorescent bulb, by comparison, is 10-25% as long at best (roughly 10,000 hours).
  2. LEDs are extremely energy efficient relative to every other commercially available lighting technology. There are several reasons for this, including the fact that they waste very little energy in the form of infrared radiation (much different than most conventional lights to include fluorescent lights), and they emit light directionally (over 180 degrees versus 360 degrees, which means there are far fewer losses from the need to redirect or reflect light).
  3. Very high light quality
  4. Very low maintenance costs and hassle

What are Minor Upsides to LED Lights?

In addition to the major advantages, LED lights also offer several smaller perks. These include the following:

  1. Accessories:LEDs require far fewer accessory lamp parts.
  2. Color:LEDs can be designed to generate the entire spectrum of visible light colors without having to use the traditional color filters required by traditional lighting solutions.
  3. Directional:LEDs are naturally directional (they emit light for 180 degrees by default).
  4. Size:LEDs can be much smaller than other lights.
  5. Warm-Up:LEDs have faster switching (no warm-up or cool-down period).

What’s the Downside to LED Lights?

Considering the upsides, you might think that LED lights are a no-brainer. While this is increasingly becoming the case,

there are still a few trade offs that need to be made when you choose LED.

In particular, LED lights are relatively expensive. The up-front costs of an LED lighting project are typically greater than most of the alternatives. This is by far the biggest downside that needs to be considered. That said, the price of LEDs are rapidly decreasing and as they continue to be adopted en masse the price will continue to drop. (If you received a proposal for LED lights that just costs too much, don't give up hope. Value engineering can help.)

Where is LED Commonly Used?

The first practical use of LEDs was in circuit boards for computers. Since then they have gradually expanded their applications to include traffic lights, lighted signs, and more recently, indoor and outdoor lighting. Much like fluorescent lights, modern LED lights are a wonderful solution for gymnasiums, warehouses, schools, and commercial buildings.

(Video) Are LED Bulbs Worth It? LEDs vs CFLs

They are also adaptable for large public areas (which require powerful, efficient lights over a large area), road lighting (which offer significant color advantages over low and high pressure sodium lights), and parking lots. For an interesting take on the history of street lighting in the United States readhere.

Lighting Comparison: LED vs Fluorescent and CFL (2)

Further Qualitative Comparison

What’s the Difference Between Fluorescent and LED Lights?

The twodifferent technologiesare entirelydifferent methods of producing light. Fluorescent bulbs contain inert gas within the glass casing while LEDs are a solid state technology. Fluorescent lights produce UV radiation and then convert it into visible light through the use of a phosphor coating inside the bulb. LEDs emit electromagnetic radiation across a small portion of the visible light spectrum and don’t waste energy by producing waste heat or non-visible electromagnetic radiation (such as UV). There is such a thing as an IRED (infrared emitting diode) which is specifically designed to emit infrared energy.

Why Would LEDs Put Fluorescent Lights Out of Business?

In the last few years LED efficiency has surpassed that of fluorescent lights and its efficiency improvements are progressing at a much more rapid rate. Further, fluorescent lamps require the use of a ballast to stabilize the internal current that produces light. When the ballast has a minor imperfection or is damaged, the light can produce an audible buzzing noise. Other shortcomings include the following:

  • Fluorescent lights can cause retrofit problems due to their elongated shape.
  • Fluorescent lights canpresent waste disposal issues due to their reliance on mercury.
  • Fluorescent lights are non-directional, meaning that they emit light for 360 degrees. As you might expect, a large portion of this light is wasted (for example, that portion that is directed at the ceiling).

Why would LEDs Put Compact Fluorescent Lights (CFLs) Out of Business?

Lighting Comparison: LED vs Fluorescent and CFL (3)

As good as fluorescent light efficiency has become, LED is better (and continues to improve at a more rapid pace). As long as fluorescent lights last, LED lights last much longer. Further, fluorescentlamps require the use of a ballast to stabilize the internal current that produces light. When the ballast

has a minor imperfection or is damaged, the light can produce an audible buzzing noise. Other shortcomings include waste disposal issues (due to CFL's reliance on mercury), and non-directional light generation. Non-directional light generation is a bigger deal than you might think. For example, light that is being directed at the ceiling rather than the room is wasted light. Therefore, CFL (as well as the related standard fluorescent bulbs) might have good “source efficiency” (i.e. it looks good on paper), but will fall shortof LED when it comes to the more important measure: “system efficiency” (actual efficiency in real world applications).

Incandescent Lighting vs Light Emitting Diode (LED) Comparison

Correlated Color Temperature

LEDs are available in a wide range of color temperatures that generally span from 2200K-6000K (ranging from yellow to light blue).

Fluorescent light is available in a range of CCT values that can be adjusted by changing the amount of phosphor inside the bulb. Typical values range between warm white at 2700K to daylight at 6500K depending on the lighting requirement.

WINNER: -

CRI

CRI for LED is highly dependent on the particular light in question. That said, a very broad spectrum of CRI values is available ranging generally from 65-95.

Typical CRI values for fluorescent light are between 62 and 80. This is fairly good color rendering but it leaves room for improvement when compared to LED.

WINNER: LED

Cycling (Turning On/Off)

LEDs are an ideal light for purposely turning on and off because they respond rather instantaneously (there is no warm up or cool down period). They produce steady light without flicker.

Fluorescent lights exhibit a short delay when turning on. Older fluorescent models actually required a significant warm up period before the tube would light but this has been improved with newer, rapid-start fluorescent lights. Possible failures or delays in the start-up process are typically due to faulty starters, transformers, or ballast. Fluorescent bulbs may also flicker, display swirling or pink light, light at the ends of the tube only, or cycle on and off as the bulb reaches the end of its useful life.

WINNER: LED

Dimming

LEDs are very easy to dim and options are available to use anywhere from 100% of the light to 0.5%. LED dimming functions by either lowering the forward current or modulating the pulse duration.

Newer CFL bulbs can be dimmed very effectively (down to about 15% of their normal light) while older fluorescent bulbs are often not suitable for dimming. If looking to dim a fluorescent bulb, make sure that you choose a ballast that is rated for dimming.

WINNER: LED

Directionality

LEDs emit light for 180 degrees. This is typically an advantage because light is usually desired over a target area (rather than all 360 degrees around the bulb). You can read more about the impact of directional lighting by learning about a measurement called “useful lumens” or “system efficiency.”

(Video) Comparison of CFL and LED Bulbs For Home Lighting - DiTuro Productions

Fluorescent light is omnidirectional meaning it emits light for 360 degrees, requiring fixture housings or reflectors to direct the emitted light.

WINNER: LED

Efficiency

LEDs are very efficient relative to every lighting type on the market. Typical source efficiency ranges 37 and 120 lumens/watt. Where LEDs really shine, however, is in their system efficiency (the amount of light that actually reaches the target area after all losses are accounted for). Most values for LED system efficiency fall above 50 lumens/watt.

Fluorescent and CFL lights are very efficient compared to incandescent lights (50-100 lumens/watt source efficiency). They lose out to LEDs principally because their system efficiency is much lower (<30 lumens/watt) due to all of the losses associated with omnidirectional light output and the need to redirect it to a desired area.

WINNER: LED

Efficiency Droop

LED efficiency drops as current increases. Heat output also increases with additional current which decreases the lifetime of the device. The overall performance drop is relatively low, however, when compared to fluorescent lights.

Fluorescent lights also experience efficiency losses as the device ages and additional current is required to achieve the same lighting output. Efficiency losses are greater and the degradation time shorter in the case of fluorescent bulbs.

WINNER: LED

Emissions

LEDs produce a very narrow spectrum of visible light without the losses to irrelevant radiation types (IR or UV) associated with conventional lighting, meaning that most of the energy consumed by the light source is converted directly to visible light.

Fluorescent lights actually produce primarily UV radiation. They generate visible light because the bulb is coated with a layer of phosphor which glows when it comes into contact with UV radiation. Roughly 15% of the emissions are lost due to energy dissipation and heat.

WINNER: LED

Ultraviolet

LEDs - NONE

Fluorescent lights produce primarily UV radiation. They generate visible light because the bulb is coated with a layer of phosphor which glows when it comes into contact with UV radiation. Although most UV radiation stays within the bulb, some does escape into the environment which can potentially be a hazard.

WINNER: LED

Failure Characteristics

LEDs fail by dimming gradually over time.

Fluorescent lights can fail in a number of different ways. Generally they exhibit an end-of-life phenomenon known as cycling where the lamp goes on and off without human input prior to eventually failing entirely.

WINNER: LED

Foot Candles

Foot candle is a measure that describes the amount of light reaching a specified surface area as opposed to the total amount of light coming from a source (luminous flux).

LEDs are very efficient relative to every lighting type on the market. Typical source efficiency ranges 37 and 120 lumens/watt. Where LEDs really shine, however, is in their system efficiency (the amount of light that actually reaches the target area after all losses are accounted for). Most values for LED system efficiency fall above 50 lumens/watt.

Fluorescent and CFL lights are very efficient compared to incandescent lights (50-100 lumens/watt source efficiency). They lose out to LEDs principally because their system efficiency is much lower (<30 lumens/watt) due to all of the losses associated with omnidirectional light output and the need to redirect it to a desired area.

(Video) Incandescent and CFL vs. LED - Ace Hardware

WINNER: LED

Heat Emissions

LEDs emit very little forward heat. The only real potential downside to this is when LEDs are used for outdoor lighting in winter conditions. Snow falling on traditional lights like HID will melt when it comes into contact with the light. This is usually overcome with LEDs by covering the light with a visor or facing the light downward towards the ground.

Fluorescent lights emit heat that is absorbed by the ballast and/or lost to the environment. Roughly 15% of the emissions are lost due to energy dissipation and heat losses. In some circumstances heat emissions could be beneficial, however, it is generally a bad thing to emit heat as it represents an energy inefficiency. The ultimate purpose of the device is to emit light, not heat.

WINNER: LED

Life Span

LEDs last longer than any light source commercially available on the market. Lifespans are variable but typical values range from 25,000 hours to 200,000 hours or more before a lamp or fixture requires replacement.

Fluorescent lights have good lifespan relative to some bulbs but not compared to LED. Typical lifespan values range from 7,000 hours to 15,000 hours before a bulb requires replacement. Note: sometimes fluorescent lights need to be changed out before the end of their useful life to preempt serious degradation effects like flicker or changing light color (turning pink).

WINNER: LED

Lifetime Cost

LED lighting has relatively high initial costs and low lifetime costs. The technology pays the investor back over time (the payback period). The major payback comes primarily from reduced maintenance costs over time (dependent on labor costs) and secondarily from energy efficiency improvements (dependent on electricity costs).

Fluorescent lights are relatively cheap to purchase but relatively expensive to maintain. Fluorescent bulbs will likely need to be purchased several times and the associated labor costs will need to be paid in order to attain the equivalent lifespan of a single LED light.

WINNER: LED

Maintenance Costs

LED has virtually zero maintenance costs and the frequency with which bulbs have to be changed out is by far the best on the market.

Fluorescent bulbs require regular relamping and ballast replacement in addition to the labor cost to monitor and replace aging or expired components.

WINNER: LED

Upfront Costs

LED has virtually zero maintenance costs and the frequency with which bulbs have to be changed out is by far the best on the market.

Fluorescent bulbs require regular relamping and ballast replacement in addition to the labor cost to monitor and replace aging or expired components.

WINNER: Fluorescent

Shock Resistance

LEDs are solid state lights (SSLs) that are difficult to damage with physical shocks.

Fluorescent bulbs are particularly fragile - especially T5, T8, and T12 tubes. Perhaps more importantly, broken fluorescent bulbs require special handling and disposal due to hazardous materials like mercury inside the lights.

WINNER: LED

Size

LEDs can be extremely small (less than 2mm in some cases) and they can be scaled to a much larger size. All in all this makes the applications in which LEDs can be used extremely diverse.

(Video) LED or CFL Which is Better for Lighting?

Compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) are designed to be small (such that they can replace an incandescent household light). Even so, they typically aren’t produced below roughly a centimeter in width. Standard fluorescent tubes are bulky and fragile at the same time. Neither compare to the small size and robust build of a solid state light like LED.

WINNER: LED

Cold Tolerance

LEDs - Minus 40 Degrees Celsius (and they will turn on instantaneously).

Fluorescent lights with regular magnetic ballasts (such as the T12 tube) are not generally recommended for temperatures below 50-60 Degrees Fahrenheit. For colder weather choose a fluorescent light with an electronic ballast such as a T8 tube.

WINNER: LED

Heat Tolerance

LEDs - 100 Degrees Celsius. LEDs are fine for all normal operating temperatures both indoors and outdoors. They do, however, show degraded performance at significantly high temperatures and they require significant heat sinking, especially when in proximity to other sensitive components.

We couldn’t find any objective data on fluorescent bulb performance in high temperature situations. If you have any information please contact us!

WINNER: LED

Warm Up Time

LEDs have virtually no warm-up time. They reach maximum brightness near instantaneously.

Fluorescent lights (particularly the older technology) require a noticeable warm up time that varies depending on the light.

WINNER: LED

Warranty

LEDs - Often 5-10 years

Fluorescent lights - typically 1-2 years

WINNER: LED

Winter Weather Conditions

LEDs produce significantly less heat than conventional gas discharge lights. This is typically a positive, however, for the unique case of application with traffic lights, there is a small potential that snow can accumulate on the bulbs. In reality, however, this is generally not an issue due to the use of visors and/or proper orientation of the light within a fixture that shields it from the elements.

Fluorescent bulbs are not generally recommended for outdoor lighting. CFLs will work but as the temperature drops the light quality suffers significantly. This is noticeable slightly below the freezing level and dramatic below about 5 degrees Fahrenheit.

WINNER: LED

Lighting Comparison: LED vs Fluorescent and CFL (4)

Read all of our lighting comparison posts!

FAQs

Which is better CFL or LED lights? ›

CFLs use 25-35% of the energy used by incandescent bulbs, but if you really want to make the biggest environmental impact on the environment, choosing LEDs is the way to go. Residential LEDs, especially those rated by ENERGY STAR, use more than 75% less energy and last 25 times longer than incandescent lighting.

Which gives more light LED or CFL? ›

LEDs are more efficient than even CFLs: A 16.5-watt LED bulb is equivalent to a 20-watt CFL and a 75-watt incandescent. A report from the DOE states that LED adoption saved consumers $14.7 billion in 2018.

Why LED bulbs better than fluorescent tubes or CFLs? ›

LED bulbs require much less wattage than CFL or Incandescent light bulbs, which is why LEDs are more energy-efficient and longer lasting than their competitors.

Are LED lights brighter than CFL? ›

CFL's or fluorescent light bulbs emit 60 lumens per watt. LED's, however, are the most effective of all, with a whopping 72 lumens per watt. This means that for around 10 watts of power, an LED will be just as bright as a 60-watt bulb.

Is fluorescent or LED more efficient? ›

LED lighting is more energy-efficient than fluorescent bulbs. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, a 12 watt LED light puts out the same lighting as a 15 watt fluorescent light. In other words, LEDs use 20% less power. Fluorescent bulbs emit UV light.

Why are LED lights better? ›

The light-emitting diode (LED) is today's most energy-efficient and rapidly-developing lighting technology. Quality LED light bulbs last longer, are more durable, and offer comparable or better light quality than other types of lighting.

Why is CFL better than LED 7? ›

The primary difference between the CFL and LED bulb is that LED bulbs are more durable and has long life. 5. Size of LED bulb is usually smaller than a CFL bulb.

How much longer do LED lights last than fluorescent? ›

LEDs have an extremely long lifespan relative to every other lighting technology (including fluorescent lights). New LEDs can last 50,000 to 100,000 hours or more. The typical lifespan for a fluorescent bulb, by comparison, is 10-25% as long at best (roughly 10,000 hours).

Which light bulb is the most energy efficient? ›

LED bulbs. Generally, the most energy efficient lighting technology you can buy for your home is the Light Emitting Diode (LED). A quality LED produces the most light with the least electricity.

What is the difference between fluorescent and LED lights? ›

The main difference between a fluorescent and an LED is their energy usage and lifespan. Fluorescent lights last around 10, 000 hours before it is required to be replaced. LED lights, on the other hand, lasts up to 60, 000 hours.

Which is Safer CFL or LED bulbs? ›

LEDs are extremely long-lasting, with lifespans up to 10 times the length of a CFL bulb. They're also highly durable and run without any heat build up. There is no mercury inside, making them safer than CFLs in that regard, and they utilize less energy than a CFL.

Why do LED lights are usually used than fluorescent light? ›

LED lighting differs from incandescent and fluorescent in several ways. When designed well, LED lighting is more efficient, versatile, and lasts longer. LEDs are “directional” light sources, which means they emit light in a specific direction, unlike incandescent and CFL, which emit light and heat in all directions.

How much more efficient is LED than CFL? ›

Energy Efficiency Winner: LEDs

CFL's use 25-35% less energy than traditional light bulbs, or incandescent bulbs, use. This is good, but not great. LED's, on the other hand, use 75% less of the energy than incandescent bulbs use. This means that LED bulbs are incredibly energy efficient.

Which uses less electricity CFL or LED? ›

LED bulbs are much more energy-efficient than CFL and incandescent bulbs. They are hands down the best smart light bulb to use with your smart home system. When first commercialized, CFLs were heralded for their 25%-35% energy savings over traditional bulbs. LED efficiency, however, has upped the ante.

What is the brightest light bulb? ›

Which type of light is brightest? When compared to other types of lighting product, LED lights are the most energy efficient and offer a brighter light for the same wattage. Good quality LED fixtures now output around 170 lumens per watt; a fluorescent puts out around 110.

Why CFL is more beneficial than electric bulb? ›

CFL (Compact fluorescent lamp) produces very less amount of heat energy and thus reduces the energy wastage. That's why CFL are more eco-friendly.

Does LED produce more heat than fluorescent? ›

Any appliance that uses electricity will generate heat, so all types of bulbs produce heat. However, LED bulbs consume far less energy compared to other kinds of bulbs, so they generate far less heat.

How long do LED lights last? ›

One of the biggest advantages of LED light fixtures, is their extended lifespan. While incandescent light bulbs were built to last around 1,000 hours, the most enduring LED light fixtures have been tested to last as long as 100,000 hours. On average LED light bulbs will not have to be changed for at least 20 years.

How do LED lights save energy? ›

Do LEDs save energy? LEDs use much less energy than incandescent bulbs because diode light is much more efficient, power-wise, than filament light. LED bulbs use more than 75% less energy than incandescent lighting. At low power levels, the difference is even larger.

How efficient is LED lighting? ›

How efficient are they? LEDs use about 85% less electricity than incandescent bulbs and as much as 50% less than fluorescents. The amount saved with fluorescents will vary depending on whether you're using a fluorescent tube or a compact fluorescent bulb (CFL).

What is 40 watt LED equivalent to? ›

Converting Lumens to Watts
LumensEquivalent Wattage
25025
47040
80660
1521100

What is 15 watt LED equivalent to? ›

LED light bulbs take energy efficiency to another level, using around 40% less energy than CFL equivalents.
...
LED equivalents to CFL light bulbs.
CFL Light Bulb WattageLED Equivalent Wattage
15 Watt9 Watt
9 Watt5.5 Watt
5 Watt3 Watt
1 more row
9 Mar 2018

How bright is 18 watt LED? ›

-18 Watt has over 2,430 Lumens and can replace 40-70 Watt Metal Halide/HID/HPS lights, 200W incandescent or 36W CFL. Save up to 80% on your energy! 5000K light color ensures a bright clear light.

What is the LED equivalent of a 40 watt fluorescent bulb? ›

Wattage to Brightness Comparison

A 40 watt incandescent filament bulb produces roughly 460 lumens. An equivalent compact fluorescents (CFL) bulb in light output (lumens) should consume only around 7 watts and LEDs approximately 6 watts.

Can I replace fluorescent tubes with LED? ›

You have fluorescent troffers or strip fixtures already, and you're wondering if you can just pop LED tubes in them or if you'll need to change out the fixtures for something designed for LED. Good news: You can absolutely use LED tubes in your existing fixtures!

What type of bulb gives the best light? ›

LED bulbs fit standard light sockets and are the most energy-efficient option. LEDs have lower wattage than incandescent bulbs but emit the same light output. This allows them to produce the same amount of light but use less energy. LEDs can last more than 20 years and don't contain mercury.

Which light is best for home? ›

Best Lighting for Your Home
  • Compact fluorescent bulbs are the way to go. If you want to optimize the lighting in your home, compact fluorescent bulbs are the way to go for most applications. ...
  • Fluorescent bulbs can be tailored to the need. ...
  • CFLs may also be better for applying makeup and shaving.
21 Sept 2010

What is the safest light bulb to use? ›

One of the most efficient and long-lasting types of bulbs on the market, LED bulbs pose no fire hazard thanks to their ability to absorb the heat that they create. LEDs have been found to contain a number of harmful chemicals and substances including arsenic, lead, and nickel.

Are LED lights florescent? ›

We also hear, "Are led light bulbs fluorescent lights?" so we'd like to take the time to answer it: LED lights and fluorescent lights are not the same. The main difference between fluorescent and LED lights is in their energy usage, longevity, and ideal place of use.

Is fluorescent lighting energy efficient? ›

Fluorescent tubes have traditionally been a source of efficient and effective lighting in homes, long before compact fluorescent and LED lights came along. They are most commonly found in kitchens, either in a long 'strip' form (three or four feet in length) and occasionally circular.

Which light is good for health? ›

Blue light is a fundamental and biologically necessary portion of the light spectrum, the specific type of light that innervates our circadian rhythm and the resulting cascade of biological processes that keeps our bodies running in good health.

Are fluorescent bulbs or LED lights better for the environment? ›

The study – which evaluated not only the use but also the manufacturing, transport, and disposal of LED, CFL, and incandescent lamps throughout each product lifecycle – found that LEDs have less negative environmental impacts than incandescent bulbs and a slight edge over CFLs.

What is better than LED lights? ›

XED or Xenon Energy Saving Discharge Lamps are superior to the most popular LED or Light Emitting Diodes in many ways. XED lights are better in terms of spectral contents, power consumption as well as total running life hours. They produce less glares and are clearer under foggy weather.

Why are fluorescent lights still used? ›

Fluorescent lights have a variety of great advantages over old lighting technology, like incandescents. They're much more efficient, so they use less energy. They also have a longer lifespan—about 13x longer—so they don't need to be replaced as often.

Is it worth changing CFL to LED? ›

LEDs generally cost more, but the long-term savings are often worth it. Even though CFLs were initially known for consuming less energy, they are still not as energy efficient as LEDs. LEDs also reduce the cost of replacement lamps and maintenance time and fees. CFLs last around 8,000 hours.

Which is Safer CFL or LED bulbs? ›

LEDs are extremely long-lasting, with lifespans up to 10 times the length of a CFL bulb. They're also highly durable and run without any heat build up. There is no mercury inside, making them safer than CFLs in that regard, and they utilize less energy than a CFL.

Can I replace a CFL bulb with an LED bulb? ›

Most importantly, are they interchangeable? Yes, LED and CFL lightbulbs are interchangeable because they can be used in the same fixtures. No alterations are required and you can quickly and easily switch between the two different types of lightbulb.

Which light bulb saves the most energy? ›

LED bulbs. Generally, the most energy efficient lighting technology you can buy for your home is the Light Emitting Diode (LED). A quality LED produces the most light with the least electricity.

How much more efficient is LED than CFL? ›

Energy Efficiency Winner: LEDs

CFL's use 25-35% less energy than traditional light bulbs, or incandescent bulbs, use. This is good, but not great. LED's, on the other hand, use 75% less of the energy than incandescent bulbs use. This means that LED bulbs are incredibly energy efficient.

What is 60 watt LED bulb equivalent? ›

A 60-watt incandescent light bulb can be replaced with a 10-watt LED.

Is CFL is less energy-efficient as compared to an LED lamp? ›

A CFL is less energy-efficient as compared to an LED lamp.

Which bulb is better for eyes? ›

Compact Fluorescent Lights (CFLs): CFL bulbs produce fewer UV rays and are more energy efficient than bright white incandescent and fluorescent tube bulbs.

Which light is good for health? ›

Blue light is a fundamental and biologically necessary portion of the light spectrum, the specific type of light that innervates our circadian rhythm and the resulting cascade of biological processes that keeps our bodies running in good health.

Which light bulb is the safest? ›

However, high quality LEDs are the safest light bulbs available. Most manufacturers have stopped making glass LED bulbs and opt for plastic or acrylic instead, so they're less prone to shattering and less likely to harm you if broken.

Can you put LED lights in fluorescent light fixture? ›

You have fluorescent troffers or strip fixtures already, and you're wondering if you can just pop LED tubes in them or if you'll need to change out the fixtures for something designed for LED. Good news: You can absolutely use LED tubes in your existing fixtures!

Do I need to remove ballast for LED lights? ›

An LED light does not require a ballast because it uses a component called a “driver” to regulate the power going into the bulb.

Can LED light bulbs be used in any light fixture? ›

LEDs can be used in any light fixture, as long as it's not enclosed or air-tight, and is not an old-style dimmer system. Both these will shorten the lifespan of LED bulbs.

What bulb is closest to natural light? ›

Halogen bulbs are a type of incandescent that gives a close approximation of natural daylight, known as "white light." Colors appear sharper under halogen light and the bulbs can be dimmed.

Which light is best for home? ›

Best Lighting for Your Home
  • Compact fluorescent bulbs are the way to go. If you want to optimize the lighting in your home, compact fluorescent bulbs are the way to go for most applications. ...
  • Fluorescent bulbs can be tailored to the need. ...
  • CFLs may also be better for applying makeup and shaving.
21 Sept 2010

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